from the magazine

Built to Last: the boomerang is the opposite of throwaway design. Nicholas Shakespeare tries to catch its appeal

Reading the Game: the greatest sports stars often seem less hurried than the rest. But what does this mean exactly? Ed Smith stops the clock to find the answer

Photo Essay: Igor Emmerich grew up on a coast that had been ruined by tourism. But, as he explained to Simon Willis, he now slips away to capture unspoilt shores and their clouds

Beware of baboons. Kelly Phelan on the joys of bush braais, beers and Mma Ramotswe’s favourite tipple

THEME OF THE WEEK...INTOXICATION

For Marx, it was religion—but that was 170 years ago, and now our society is largely secular. What’s our opiate now? Rosie Blau introduces the Big Question

At Cambridge over the summer, many students were taking pills to help their concentration. Ed Cumming was among them

Writers who drink are old hat. But what about writers who quit drinking? Tom Shone studied them for a novel

Deep in the Brazilian rainforest there is a town built around a church where worshippers drink hallucinogenic tea. Alex Bellos took a trip up the Amazon to sample the high life in Céu do Mapiá

  • FASHION MEETS OCEANOGRAPHY

    Applied Fashion: trends may ebb and trends may flow. Rebecca Willis stands back from the tides of change to take the long view read more »
  • UNDERNEATH THE ASH CLOUDS

    Cartophilia: a student and adventurer spent decades creating the first map of the rocks that underpin Iceland. The geologist John Maclennan retraces his steps read more »
  • WHAT'S THE BEST TIME OF DAY?

    The Big Question: are you happiest burning the midnight oil, or stealing a march on the world by rising at dawn? Or are the in-between moments the best of all? Ali Smith, Elif Shafak and five other writers give us a good time read more »
  • HOW EDDIE REDMAYNE DID IT

    What does it take to play Professor Stephen Hawking? Grit, empathy, attention to detail and the ability to shut down facial muscles one by one. Clemency Burton-Hill follows Redmayne through a process that earned him an Oscar
    read more »
  • THE FEARLESS JULIANNE MOORE

    Visual CV: she was a late starter, but now she's an Oscar-winner for her agonising portrayal of a woman with early-onset Alzheimer's. Nicholas Barber picks her best performances read more »
  • ROCKS AND ROLLS

    My Madeleine: on childhood holidays on the Baltic coast, Benjamin Markovits found a sense of belonging at the breakfast table read more »
  • DEPRAVITY HOLDS ALL THE CARDS

    A Game, a Gadget and an App: Tom Standage plays a card game for "horrible people", tries out the best e-reader yet, and finds an interactive book that beats a chemistry set   read more »
  • THE LONGEST SKI-RUN IN THE WORLD

    And when your 70th birthday is approaching, it feels even longer. The novelist Justin Cartwright faces his fears in the Vallée Blanche read more »
  • HOLLYWOOD'S COMPUTER PROBLEM

    At the Cinema: Michael Mann’s new film has difficulties with digital—echoing, Tom Shone argues, those of film-making as a whole read more »
  • THE WISDOM OF ANNE TYLER

    Six Good Books: Maggie Fergusson's recommendations, including a triumphant portrait of old age, the human side of T.S. Eliot and a haunting memoir from Zambia read more »